Nonprofits Built Themselves on a Dream. Their New Mission: Survival.

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That was how matters ended up at No Limitations, the New Jersey cafe. Then it got strike by that tidal wave that Mr. Delaney of the Nonprofit Council talked about.

No Boundaries is in Middletown, not much from where by Ms. Cartier and her spouse, Mark, a government bond trader, are living. The cafe was established with the idea it would give their third kid, Katie, who has Down syndrome, both of those a position and a foreseeable future.

“When a man or woman with mental disabilities turns 21, that is known as ‘falling off the cliff,’” explained Ms. Cartier, 57. “Up to that position, you are supported by your school method, but there are not a good deal of significant employment or college or university packages for this population.”

Neither of the Cartiers had any cafe practical experience, but they plunged forward with their concept. They observed a internet site, a previous Italian cafe, and put in many months modifying it so the kitchen, for occasion, could accommodate men and women working with wheelchairs and walkers. They applied for nonprofit standing, solicited donations, employed a chef to style and design a menu. They spent much more than $200,000 of their personal income.

As it transpired, Katie did go to faculty, to a specific method at George Mason University, but the cafe was flooded with occupation candidates. On Feb. 4, when No Boundaries experienced its gentle opening, it served 80 men and women. It received some regional publicity. It may possibly have caught on.

And now? Limbo while the virus rampages.

Tommy Hedden, 26, was 1 of the cafe cooks. It was a considerable action up from his former career as a cart attendant at the Meals Town supermarket. He designed $11 an hour.

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